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Omar Khayyam - on religion by YamaLama1986 Omar Khayyam - on religion :iconyamalama1986:YamaLama1986 8 22 Uniform depiction update: Emilio de Bono by YamaLama1986 Uniform depiction update: Emilio de Bono :iconyamalama1986:YamaLama1986 3 0 Thucydides - commoners and the truth by YamaLama1986 Thucydides - commoners and the truth :iconyamalama1986:YamaLama1986 33 14 Thucydides - blame for the loss of liberty by YamaLama1986 Thucydides - blame for the loss of liberty :iconyamalama1986:YamaLama1986 11 6 Niccolo Machiavelli - good and bad Roman Emperors by YamaLama1986 Niccolo Machiavelli - good and bad Roman Emperors :iconyamalama1986:YamaLama1986 13 14 Booker T Washington - self-reliance by YamaLama1986 Booker T Washington - self-reliance :iconyamalama1986:YamaLama1986 11 21 John L Dube - the awakening of the Natives by YamaLama1986 John L Dube - the awakening of the Natives :iconyamalama1986:YamaLama1986 5 0 British King George V with S. African Native corps by YamaLama1986 British King George V with S. African Native corps :iconyamalama1986:YamaLama1986 16 1 Jan Smuts and Winston Churchill by YamaLama1986 Jan Smuts and Winston Churchill :iconyamalama1986:YamaLama1986 11 10 Allied leaders - First Quebec Conference - 1943 by YamaLama1986 Allied leaders - First Quebec Conference - 1943 :iconyamalama1986:YamaLama1986 18 5 Pixley Seme - unity of native South Africans by YamaLama1986 Pixley Seme - unity of native South Africans :iconyamalama1986:YamaLama1986 6 0 Louis Botha - South Africa and World War I by YamaLama1986 Louis Botha - South Africa and World War I :iconyamalama1986:YamaLama1986 9 7 John Diefenbaker - rejecting multiculturalism by YamaLama1986 John Diefenbaker - rejecting multiculturalism :iconyamalama1986:YamaLama1986 12 2 Gustave Le Bon - religous devotion to a cause by YamaLama1986 Gustave Le Bon - religous devotion to a cause :iconyamalama1986:YamaLama1986 9 2 Karl Marx - British rule in India by YamaLama1986 Karl Marx - British rule in India :iconyamalama1986:YamaLama1986 11 0 Joseph Chamberlain - justification for empire by YamaLama1986 Joseph Chamberlain - justification for empire :iconyamalama1986:YamaLama1986 11 7

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YamaLama1986

Artist | Digital Art
Canada
I am interested in history, especially in cultural, military, and political areas. On DA I am especially focused on creating uniform depictions for the group PIXEL-ARCHIVES.

I will talk with anyone and seek to have constructive conversation with anyone that I may be interested in conversing with. That does not mean that I necessarily agree with them though.

I have created artwork involving quotes of historically significant people or uniform depictions of historically significant people. My creation of such artwork does not mean that I necessarily agree with the person's view but that I regard it as significant or unique that deserves attention.

I will allow my works to be included in any group that may have an interest in having them so that attention is brought to them. However inclusion of my works in any politically oriented group does not mean that I either endorse or oppose the politics or other beliefs of the group about which the content is about.

When I add quotes from historical figures it does not necessarily mean I agree with them but that I regard them as historically significant to the topic they are on.

RULES ON COMMENTING:

I will respond to constructive criticism. I will not respond to people being hostile with the content of their posts being mainly petty insults and character assassination with little constructive criticism.

Activity


I have seen all sorts of machismo rhetoric by people that demands that self-respecting men need to become cold and stoic to the point of being anti-social with a near sociopathic lack of empathy because any sign of sentimentality is deemed unmanly and effeminate. Below this text is a video clip showing mixed martial arts fighter Georges St-Pierre from the province of Quebec in my country Canada describing overcoming the resentment he held towards a former bully after he just by accident ran into him. While I am an atheist and am a critic of various aspects of Christianity, the value of forgiveness promoted in Christian culture and many other religious cultures, is something that every atheist should keep in mind given the immense lack of it in the world. Forgiveness does not mean forgetting or tolerating what happened, it means letting go of resentment for actions in the past for the sake of one's own well-being to not let it infect your life. While I may be making the No-True-Scotsman Fallacy, I say that the violent and coldly stoic manhood promoted by machismo is not real manhood in the sense that this is exaggerated, sick, and appears to be derived from a legacy of lives of people who have faced immense abuse; and I think the video below challenges this disturbingly significant phenomenon among men.

For a long time I had a similar problem of holding resentment to a bully in my past who made my life absolutely miserable and had a negative affect on my health as other situations compounded it. I wrathfully hated that person who bullied me for many years. People have faced far worse problems than I have that have made them resentful, but I understand the basics of it. I have learned over time of the danger that resentment does to a person. Resentment grows like a disease, it will eventually infect every part of your life if you let it grow and consume you, you can be brought into the worst of depressions with a contempt and hatred for the world and a sick desire to see others you believe to be doing better than you brought down to misery to feel satisfaction that at least others who have done better than you can be brought down to face the agony you have gone through. This is the poisonous disease of resentment at its height, I have faced it and when I went that far I became scared at how hateful and malicious I had become and decided I had to change.

Through experience in life and reading Nietzsche who speaks of the dangers of resentment in society and reflection on this, I have realized that far more people in the world are driven by resentment than what I previously thought; where hatred, anger, and violent emotion is seen as powerful and worthy of respect and where forgiveness, fear, and emotional attachment to others outside of sexual relationships, are seen as weak. This is born from a life facing violence all the time from peers - it is the etiquette of repeat-offender convicts in a jail where violent power is the most respected form of power and where any sign of weakness may incite attack from others. There is a time and place where violence is needed - a person should defend their partner and their children with violence if someone intends to violently harm them and there are no other means to stop them, but the worship of the power that violence provides while seeking to be completely detached from any sentimental emotions of attachment and forgiveness is sick, and its persistence in the machismo culture of groups claiming to promote restoring masculinity are only creating a masculinity that is created from a psychology born from broken homes and abuse in childhoods as well as later in life. Men can do better and be both physically and mentally strong, and I think the experience of the man in the video below shows an example of this. I think this is real manhood that is not denying any part of life experience but resolving to achieve the best regardless of setbacks in life.


Omar Khayyam - on religion
Persian poet and polymath Omar Khayyam on the topic of religion in his famous work the Rubaiyat. As a polymath he was a mathematician and an astronomer.

Khayyam was born in Nishapur that then had a large Zoroastrian religious community alongside the Islamic religious community to a Muslim family whose father had been Zoroastrian but had converted to Islam, and Khayyam was a Muslim. In the Rubaiyat while he never directly rejects the existence of a god or an afterlife, he challenges interpretations of the divine that are contrary to conclusions derived from reason. However he talks in exaggerated tense of there being no heaven immediately after saying that he has no doubt that heaven exists is in the previous quatrain, this is a rhetorical way of telling the reader that they should not fixate on going into the afterlife and instead focus on the present life they are living.

He was a scholar following the rationalist discourse in the Islamic world held among a school of scholars who adopted rationalism from ancient Greek philosophy that had influence in Islamic societies at that time. Khayyam made radical rejections of common claims by clerics who declared that people must live a strict ascetic life seeking to avoid indulging in worldly pleasures in order to guarantee access to the afterlife. He asserted that reason shows that God would not have created such pleasures in the first place if he did not want people to enjoy them. He also asserted that people should live a life focused in the present and enjoying what life has to offer and not give up everything in their life to be ascetic in order to appease God as such clerics were demanding.

Khayyam's Rubaiyat was and remains a radical and rebellious text with regards to Islamic clerics in Iran and elsewhere promoting strict ascetic life with him challenging them through him appealing to reason as contradicting their claims. His poetry in the Rubaiyat became world-renowned upon its translation into English in the 19th century, likely especially because of his claim that living a life of pleasure is not against the will of God because God must have willed people to have such pleasures in the first place, countering claims made by promoters of ascetic life.

In short, he was would be regarded as one of the major historical proponents of carpe diem (Latin for "seize the day" or "seize the present").

Note 1: There has been some dispute as to whether Khayyam wrote the Rubaiyat, however most historical text regard him as the author and I am following their take on the matter.

Note 2: I have posted this quote because it is a quote of an important historical figure. This is not posted here to endorse the politics involved in this quote, if people choose to support or use this image for political reasons, that is their decision and responsibility, not mine. With these points in mind, I will accept this image being included in any group interested in having this image.
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Uniform depiction update: Emilio de Bono
For those who follow me for my uniform depictions, I've been got busy with things in life but I still am working on uniform depictions.

Shown in the photo is Italian Marshal Emilio de Bono of the Regio Esercito (Royal Army). I am working of a uniform depiction of him dating from 1938-43 during his participation in the Fascist regime at the time of Italy's participation in World War II on the Axis side. I am having difficulty finding good photos and documentation of de Bono's awards, if anyone knows of any good photos or sources of his awards from 1938 onward, if you could let me know, that would be appreciated

De Bono was a veteran of World War I and he one of the Fascist Quadrumvirs - the four leaders who organized the Fascists' March on Rome in 1922 that led to the Italian government capitulating to accept having the Fascist Duce Benito Mussolini appointed as Prime Minister of Italy by Italian King Vittorio Emanuele III. Subsequently De Bono and the other Quadrumvirs were highly influential figures in the Fascist regime. He was the highest awarded of the four Quadrumvirs, receiving Italy's highest order of knighthood the Supreme Order of the Most Holy Annunciation. He was governor of the Italian colonies of Tripolitania from 1925-29 and Eritrea in 1935, Minister of the Italian Colonies from 1929-35, and he was selected to lead the conquest of Ethiopia from 1935-36 so that a leading Fascist official would be the military commander who was victorious over Ethiopia to which he succeeded in 1936. At the time of Italy's entry into WW2 in 1940 he was in command of an army corps in Sicily to defend against possible attack by the Allies and was later made Minister of State in 1942. In 1943, with Italy facing multiple military defeats including losing all of its colonies to Allied forces and the Italian Army in Russia being almost completely crushed in the Battle of Stalingrad in February of that year, Fascist government officials who had previously been loyal to Mussolini, including de Bono, removed Mussolini from power with the support of the King after he refused to make a separate armistice with the Allies and become neutral in the war. After Mussolini's rescue by Germany and the establishment of the Italian Social Republic (RSI), de Bono was captured and executed by the RSI in 1944.

I am also looking to soon create a uniform depiction of the Italian Crown Prince Umberto in Regio Esercito uniform from the period of 1938-43 during the initial part of Italy being in World War II on the Axis side. I will return to work soon on the templates for Italian soldiers as well.
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I have seen all sorts of machismo rhetoric by people that demands that self-respecting men need to become cold and stoic to the point of being anti-social with a near sociopathic lack of empathy because any sign of sentimentality is deemed unmanly and effeminate. Below this text is a video clip showing mixed martial arts fighter Georges St-Pierre from the province of Quebec in my country Canada describing overcoming the resentment he held towards a former bully after he just by accident ran into him. While I am an atheist and am a critic of various aspects of Christianity, the value of forgiveness promoted in Christian culture and many other religious cultures, is something that every atheist should keep in mind given the immense lack of it in the world. Forgiveness does not mean forgetting or tolerating what happened, it means letting go of resentment for actions in the past for the sake of one's own well-being to not let it infect your life. While I may be making the No-True-Scotsman Fallacy, I say that the violent and coldly stoic manhood promoted by machismo is not real manhood in the sense that this is exaggerated, sick, and appears to be derived from a legacy of lives of people who have faced immense abuse; and I think the video below challenges this disturbingly significant phenomenon among men.

For a long time I had a similar problem of holding resentment to a bully in my past who made my life absolutely miserable and had a negative affect on my health as other situations compounded it. I wrathfully hated that person who bullied me for many years. People have faced far worse problems than I have that have made them resentful, but I understand the basics of it. I have learned over time of the danger that resentment does to a person. Resentment grows like a disease, it will eventually infect every part of your life if you let it grow and consume you, you can be brought into the worst of depressions with a contempt and hatred for the world and a sick desire to see others you believe to be doing better than you brought down to misery to feel satisfaction that at least others who have done better than you can be brought down to face the agony you have gone through. This is the poisonous disease of resentment at its height, I have faced it and when I went that far I became scared at how hateful and malicious I had become and decided I had to change.

Through experience in life and reading Nietzsche who speaks of the dangers of resentment in society and reflection on this, I have realized that far more people in the world are driven by resentment than what I previously thought; where hatred, anger, and violent emotion is seen as powerful and worthy of respect and where forgiveness, fear, and emotional attachment to others outside of sexual relationships, are seen as weak. This is born from a life facing violence all the time from peers - it is the etiquette of repeat-offender convicts in a jail where violent power is the most respected form of power and where any sign of weakness may incite attack from others. There is a time and place where violence is needed - a person should defend their partner and their children with violence if someone intends to violently harm them and there are no other means to stop them, but the worship of the power that violence provides while seeking to be completely detached from any sentimental emotions of attachment and forgiveness is sick, and its persistence in the machismo culture of groups claiming to promote restoring masculinity are only creating a masculinity that is created from a psychology born from broken homes and abuse in childhoods as well as later in life. Men can do better and be both physically and mentally strong, and I think the experience of the man in the video below shows an example of this. I think this is real manhood that is not denying any part of life experience but resolving to achieve the best regardless of setbacks in life.


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:iconartlovr59:
artlovr59 Featured By Owner May 9, 2018   Photographer
Thanks for the faves!! 
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:iconalexaadersen:
AlexAAdersen Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you so much for the watch it means a lot Hug 
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:iconjimbowyrick1:
Jimbowyrick1 Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
FVTHNX!
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:iconsmall-brown-dog:
Small-Brown-Dog Featured By Owner Mar 30, 2018
Thanks for the fave :)
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:iconjimbowyrick1:
Jimbowyrick1 Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
THNXFV!

Outstanding gallery.
The quotes should be packaged as a book for students.
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:iconexpect-delays:
Expect-Delays Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2018  Student Traditional Artist
Thank you very much for your comment and for adding my work to your favorites.
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:iconyamalama1986:
YamaLama1986 Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2018   Digital Artist
No problem! :)
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:icondavinci975:
Davinci975 Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2018
thanks
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:iconkondrikthus:
Kondrikthus Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for the favorite!
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